Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia)

by Jeffrey S. Pippen | Back to Jeff's Spiders Page | Jeff's Nature Pages

Not considered dangerous to humans, Argiope spiders are large and commonly encountered and occur statewide.
Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) Dorsal view
Black and Yellow Argiope, Golden Garden Spider, Writing Spider (Argiope aurantia)
New Hanover Co., NC
28 Aug 2004

Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) Ventral view
Black and Yellow Argiope, Golden Garden Spider, Writing Spider (Argiope aurantia)
New Hanover Co., NC
28 Aug 2004


Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) Dorsal view
Black and Yellow Argiope, Golden Garden Spider, Writing Spider (Argiope aurantia)
York Co., VA
21 Aug 2013

Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) Black and Yellow Argiope, Golden Garden Spider, Writing Spider (Argiope aurantia)
Brunswick Co., NC
13 Aug 2006

Black and Yellow Argiope, Golden Garden Spider, Writing Spider (Argiope aurantia)
Island Creek, Jones Co., NC
25 Aug 2018

Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) Black and Yellow Argiope, Golden Garden Spider, Writing Spider (Argiope aurantia)
Craven Co., NC
26 Aug 2007

Called "Writing Spiders" because they "write" in the middle of their webs.


Probably Neospintharus trigonum, formerly known as Argyrodes trigonum
Duke Forest Durham Division, Orange Co., NC
21 Sep 2019

These spiders live a kleptoparasitic lifestyle, in this case stealing bits of food from the webs of larger spiders. The individual above can be seen in the upper left corner of this photo in the web of a Garden Spider (Argiope aurantia). While I didn't get a photo, I also noticed this little spider spinning together with his own silk some of the larger strands of the Garden Spider's web.



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Created on ... Oct 18, 2006 | jeffpippen9@gmail.com